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Shingle Oak (Quercus imbricaria)

Shingle Oak As its name reflects, Shingle Oak has a long history of use for making shingles. Early French colonists in Illinois found that the wood could be split into thin sheets and was also resistant to decay. The distribution of Shingle Oak is centered in the Midwest extending south to Tennessee and Arkansas and east to Pennsylvania and Maryland. In Tennessee, it is most common in the central portions of the state.

Shingle Oak Leaves The oblong to lance-shaped, dark green leaves have a short bristle tip. Three Shingle Oaks are present in the Oak Collection near the Arboretum's Program Shelter. They are readily recognized at this time of year because the dark green leaves have yet to change color. As is true for other members of the Red Oak group, the small brown acorns require two years to mature .

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University of Tennessee - Forest Resources AgResearch and Education Center
901 South Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 · Telephone: 865-483-3571 · Email: UTforest@utk.edu